KatrinaShopping: Find Loved Ones, Clothing, Info, Foods, Homes, Cars & Jobs for Evacuees

Abandoned pets, Shop for Katrina Survivors, evacuees, Katrinashopping, Katrina donations, Katrina fashion, Katrina waves, Katrina clothing, Katrina housing, Katrina homes, Katrina medications, Katrina crying, transportation, Katrina cars, Katrina vehicles, Katrina school Supplies, katrina survivors, shopping for foods, shopping for computers, furniture shopping for Katrina, water for Katrina surviors, medications and food supplies for Katrina, restaurant jobs, construction jobs

Dedicated to the Undying Love for New Orleans, the Big Easy, The Crescent City!

Welcome to Katrina Shopping Resources!

Katrina Survivors need everything. Shop for them! Make your donations!

Help Katrina Survivors Shop To Get Back To Some Normalcy! Shop for Them!

Help Them Rebuild Their Lives and Communities, Help Them Get a Job!





  • VideoVideo Upscale Indian Clothing: Sari, Sarees, Choli Suits, Sarees Stoles, Bridal Saree
  • ShopgiftShop: Upscale Clothing, Fine and Rare Gifts, Jewelry and Electronics
  • NakedBodyClothedBody: Varsity Jackets, College & University Jersey
  • Go to NakedBodyEmporium, NakedBodyApparel: Hot Suits, Dresses & Jewelry
  • Find Cool flip flops at Flip flop Shopper Guide
  • Pottermania: Pottermania Books, Shows, Games & Movie Reviews!
  • Just In for All U.S. Prom Shops: ShopAllPromDresses is Live!
  • European, Brazilian & American Women's Bikini Shops
  • All Music: Hip Hop, Rap, Reggae, R & B Artists

  • Get Auto Recalls List: Cars and Home Product Recalls!
  • Texas Prom, Cheerleading, and Wedding Shops
  • FreeStuffRecycle: Get a Gift or something for Nothing!
  • Prom & Quincenera Hot Wheels: Z3 Roadster, Nissan 350 and more
  • John Paul's Successor and Pope Benedict XVI: Doctrinal, Religious & Social Issues
  • Just In For Californiapromdresses
  • Soup Nazi Kitchen & Soup Nazi Int'l: Homemade soup & Vietnamese Pho
  • Just In For New York Prom Dresses
    Top Prom Designers
  • Quincenera & Prom Dresses via Celebrity Fashion Live Magazine
  • Just In For Miami Beach's Hot Prom & Quincenera Dresses
  • Just In For Georgia Elegant Prom Dresses
  • Just In For Texas Hot Prom Dresses
  • Just in For Directory
    Of Beautiful Prom Dresses & Gowns
  • Just In for Quincenera Dresses
  • Just In for Shoe Designers: All Manolo Shoes
  • Just In for Quincenera & Prom Underwear & Intimates
  • Just In For ShopHouseShop:
    Buyer & Seller Housing Data & Tips
  • ShopbizShop: Consumers' Shopping Decisions & Business Leadership Reviews
  • Please visit AllgiftShopping Wishlist: Holiday & Digital Cameras Shopping
  • Hot, Exotic Caribbean & European Travel Destinations
  • Buy and Sell Your Surplus of Clothes, Jewelries, Shoes and Unused Items


  • Friday, September 16, 2005

    President Bush's Address at the National Day of Prayer

    THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE: On this Day of Prayer and Remembrance, our nation remains in the shadow of a storm that departed two weeks ago. We're humbled by the vast and indifferent might of nature, and feel small beside its power. We commend the departed to God. We mourn with those who mourn, and we ask for strength in the work ahead.

    The destruction is immense, covering a city, a coastline, a region. Yet the hurt always comes down to one life, one family. We've seen the panic of loved ones separated from each other, the lonely pain of people whose earthly possessions were swept away, and the uncertainty of men and women and children driven away from the lives they knew. Many did not survive the fury of the storm. Many who did ask, why -- and wonder, what comes next.

    In this hour of suffering, we're prayerful. In a wounded region, so many placed their faith in a God who hears and helps. And so many are bringing their grief to a Savior acquainted with grief. Our nation joins with them to pray for comfort and sorrow, for the reunion of separated families, and a holy rest for the ones who died.

    Through prayer we look for ways to understand the arbitrary harm left by this storm, and the mystery of undeserved suffering. And in our search we're reminded that God's purposes are sometimes impossible to know here on Earth. Yet even as we're humbled by forces we cannot explain, we take comfort in the knowledge that no one is ever stranded beyond God's care. The Creator of wind and water is also the source of even a greater power -- a love that can redeem the worst tragedy, a love that is stronger than death.

    In this hour of suffering, our nation is thankful. We have been inspired by acts of courage and goodness: Coast Guardsmen and military personnel reaching out of helicopters and lifting victims from rooftops; firefighters wading through mud and debris to search for victims and survivors; doctors and nurses defying danger so their patients might live. Many of those who saved others lost their own homes and were separated from their own families. And many stories of heroism and rescue will never be told because they are known to God alone.

    We're thankful for a spirit seen across the Gulf Coast that faces the worst and chooses to hope. We're thankful, as well, for the many ordinary citizens who heard the cries of neighbors and answered them. Across the country, Americans saw the hungry and gave them something to eat; saw the thirsty and gave them something to drink; saw strangers and invited them in. One man who was rescued and given shelter after the storm said, "I didn't think there was so much love in the world."

    In this hour of suffering, our nation is also mindful of the work ahead. Through this tragedy great duties have come to our nation. The destruction of this hurricane was beyond any human power to control, but the restoration of broken communities and disrupted lives now rests in our hands. And we accept this responsibility not as a burden or a chore, but as an opportunity to serve our fellow Americans, as they would do for us.

    This task will measure our unity as a people. Americans of every race and religion were touched by this storm; yet some of the greatest hardship fell upon citizens already facing lives of struggle -- the elderly, the vulnerable, and the poor. And this poverty has roots in generations of segregation and discrimination that closed many doors of opportunity. As we clear away the debris of a hurricane, let us also clear away the legacy of inequality. Let us deliver new hope to communities that were suffering before the storm. As we rebuild homes and businesses, we will renew our promise as a land of equality and decency. And one day, Americans will look back at the response to Hurricane Katrina and say that our country grew not only in prosperity, but in character and justice.

    On this National Day of Prayer and Remembrance, we pledge ourselves to the demanding work of revival, and renew the faith and hope that will carry that work to completion. In the worst of storms, and in the rush of flood waters, even the strongest faith can be tested. Yet the Scriptures assure us, "many waters cannot quench love; neither can the floods drown it."

    So now we go forward, confident in the good heart of America, and trusting that even among the ruins, the love of God remains at work.

    May God bless and keep the souls of the lost. May His love touch all those in need, and may He always watch over the United States of America. God bless.

    Sunday, September 11, 2005

    What You Could Do For a Katrina Evacuee Couple

    Help them get some semblance of normalcy by buying them a nice pair of nightgown. Help them bring love back to where it's supposed to be. Remember that they lost everything in the floods. The donations of clothes and shoes may not cover much. Many of them will not receive the promised $2000. Buy them something that may heal them. Something extraordinary. After all, despite the tragedy they have been through, they are husband and wife.


    A River of Tears Amidst the Waves of Despair & Floodings




    I am moved by this picture. A strong woman cries. I shed tears at night. When the day is over, I cry over the deads. I cry over the new orphans whose parents were washed away. I cry over the uncertainty of these people's future. I cried over the conditions that kept them in the city when the National Weather Service made announcements. I cried over their courage in facing the spotlight and the waters that surround them. I cried over the dead bodies who were not picked up. I cried over the bodies found in the attic. I cried. I cried again. I cried when I saw Oprah crying. I cried when I saw children crying of hunger and thirst. I cried when mothers could not afford to breastfeed their babies any longer. Their milk ran dry. I cried when I saw this woman crying. I cried for all my pains. I cried for the lack of care and attention I receive. I cried in front of the indifference of my neighbors. I cried for my neighbors. My tears are now dry. My eyes are swollen. I became ashamed by so much indifference. I shed tears in private. I cried and mourned the passing of all these people in the public streets. I cried for all of them!
    PromQuincenera


    A New Orleans family tries to make their way to safety. New Orleans saw the waters rising.
    PromQuincenera


    Water and Oil. A woman is trying to reach higher ground and safety. The weight of the world came crashing on her back.
    PromQuincenera


    Discomfort, Pain, Uncertainty, Despair, Loneliness may be some of the characteristics one takes away from this picture, but as for me, I see a mother's love for her son. Love in the face of horror. Love in the face of calamity. Love in the face of misunderstanding. Love when your world turns upside down. Love when all your possessions are washed away. Hang onto your prized possession, your family and relations when you are rescued with the clothes on your back. Love when the rains come down hard. Love when you are pressed by the pressures of life. Keep your eyes on the prize.
    PromQuincenera

    Saturday, September 10, 2005

    Looting Did Happen in New Orleans: AP Proves it with More Pictures Besides the Controversy Picture Language

    Stores had their front doors pried open. Looters rush in. They take merchandise they could never afford. Some rushed to the jewelry sections. Others needed clothes and got them. More and more of those who rushed inside the Walgreens, Wal-Mart of the French Quarter got foods and water. They also took baby formula. They did what they were supposed to do to keep these babies and old people alive on the streets.
    A small group of the looters were hardened criminals who seized the occasion to engage in criminal activities. What would a man do with ten pairs of jeans, plastic loads of jewelry which they floated on planks in the rising waters?

    Any way, Yahoo News published a statement about the language of the AP picture that created a controversy among bloggers and columnists and reporters. Now Yahoo News re-published the picture with a statement. This time, more pictures of looters are also published. Spectators were shocked by the sight of the looters. Others just commented on the oppression these people broke away from. "For people who are oppressed all their live, it's an opportunity to get back at society," reasoned a gentleman named Mike Franklin as reported by AP. The City of Haves and Haves Not collided after Hurricane Katrina passed. The rising waters caused chaos. Police were outnumbered. They needed assistance which was somewhat slow to arrive. Finally, help did arrive from all the corners of the country.

    Wednesday, September 07, 2005

    The United States of America's Good Acts to Other Countries Pay Back: Countries That Want To Give Aid to Evacuees

    In times like these, you'll know who is with you and who is against you. In times such as Katrina's aftermath, the US finds out which countries are standing with her. When 80 percent of a major American city is flooded and its inhabitants are displaced and have all kinds of needs, you can feel good knowing that others want to hand you a hand.

    Country Support
    Afghanistan $100,000
    Armenia $100,000
    Australia $7.6 million
    Azerbaijan $500,000
    Bahamas $50,000
    Bahrain $5 million
    Bangladesh $1 million
    Belgium Medical/logistics teams
    Canada 2 helicopters, 32-person rescue team, evacuation flights, medical supplies
    China $5.1 million cash and relief supplies
    Djibouti $50,000
    Finland Search-and-rescue team; 3 logistics specialists
    France Tents, tarps, MREs, water treatment supplies, cleaning equipment
    Gabon $500,000
    Georgia $50,000
    Germany MREs, high speed pumps, forensic experts
    Greece 2 cruise ships
    India $5 million
    Iraq $1,000,000 cash
    Ireland $1,000,000 cash
    Country Support
    Israel Tents, first-aid kits, baby formula
    Italy Generators, water pumps/purifiers, tents, med supplies
    Japan $200,000 cash and $844,000 in relief supplies, $1.5 million in private donations.
    Kuwait $400 million in oil, $100 million cash
    Maldives $25,000 cash
    Mexico Transport vehicles, 1 helicopter, ambulance and medical teams.
    Mongolia $50,000 cash
    Nepal $25,000 cash
    New Zealand $1.4 million cash, search and rescue teams
    Nigeria $1 million cash
    Norway $1.54 million in relief supplies
    Qatar $100 million cash
    Republic of Korea $30 million cash and in-kind donations
    Saudi Arabia $5 million from Aramco, $250,000 from Agfund
    Singapore 3 helicopters
    Sri Lanka $25,000 cash
    Taiwan $2 million cash, medical supplies
    Thailand Forensic experts, blankets and food
    UAE $100 million cash
    UK MREs
    Venezuela Up to $1 million

    Source: State Department

    This is amazing. The world's response is fantastic. It makes sense that the US never stopped a minute before considering helping other countries.

    Tuesday, September 06, 2005

    John Travolta and Hurricane Katrina

    John Travolta flew his own plane in and delivered supplies. How many other super stars will follow in his footsteps?

    Well, they may not be able to fly in, but their contributions can go a long way. Contribute to the Red Cross. Contribute to the Bush Clinton Katrina Fund.

    Bush-Clinton Katrina Fund is Up: Make Your Contributions to the Gulf Coast Region


    Bush Clinton Katrina Fund Icon - link to our web site


    "
    Press Releases
    Bush-Clinton Katrina Fund Raises Over $2 Million in Online Donations
    Raised $2 million in online funds in hours

    Published Tuesday, September 6, 2005 5:00 pm


    The Bush-Clinton Katrina Fund announced that it has raised over $2 million in online donations. This announcement comes less than 6 hours after the Fund announced that it had raised $1 million dollars online in approximately 24 hours.

    “The American people have immediately stepped in to help with this relief effort with an amazing showing of generosity,” President Clinton said. “I am so proud and encouraged by the tremendous support offered to these people in need. This truly is an example of the goodness and caring of the American people.”

    The Fund estimates that over 10,000 people have made their donations on their website www.BushClintonKatrinaFund.org.

    “Rebuilding the Gulf States is going to take every dollar we raise,” President Bush said. “I am pleased with this initial outpouring of support and hope that it continues in the days and weeks ahead.”

    The Bush-Clinton Katrina Fund will serve as an umbrella for the three special funds established by Governors Blanco, Barbour, and Riley to assist their states and will largely focus on collecting donations to assist in the recovery plan for the affected states" (Bush-Clinton Katrina Fund).

    To make a contribution to the Bush-Clinton Katrina Fund, please visit: www.BushClintonKatrinaFund.org.



    Source: Bush-Clinton Katrina Fund helps you make a contribution!

    MoveOn's Hurricanehousing.org Helps Find Free Housing Offers. The Country Seems to Respond

    Just attribute this feast to the power of the Internet. Attribute it to the goodwill of the MoveOn's civic organization. HurricaneHousing allows people from all over the country to donate free housing to the evacues of the hurricane-striken and flood-covered Gulfport regions. It's also a feast of applications that try to solve the most urgent social and political problems.

    As far away as Colorado, California, thousands of people can go to Hurricanehousing to either donate or make a bedroom available to these needy people. They can remove their offers whenever they want to. This is great. So far, 179,776 beds have been found thanks to the website.

    Now, if you have space available, you will find the process of offering your housing very easy to use. As posted on hurricanehousing.org, here's what to remember:

    "Your info is hidden. If you offer to host, people looking for housing will be able to see your posting, but not your name and email. You can choose whether or not to list your phone number.

    We pass you requests by email. When someone requests housing through our site, we will send you an email with their contact info and their message to you. It's your responsibility to follow up with them by email or phone.

    You remove your offer when it's filled. When you post an offer, we'll send you a confirmation email with a link to remove your posting in case you fill it, or no longer have space. People will continue to contact you until you do so.
    Be patient. Even with our outreach efforts, it may take up to a week or two for word of the housing you've offered to reach the people who need it" (Hurricanehousing.org).

    Do something to help someone in need today. Click on the link across this page!

    Make sure you protect yourself. Be smart enough to read the guidelines posted on the same web site. "You decide whom to take in among the people you contact." This statement said it all. Make sure you have some key questions to ask the potential evacuees. "Don't Discriminate" is also good to remember.

    Monday, September 05, 2005

    Random Acts of Kindness: Surprise one of your neighbors With a Bag of Grocery!



    Black People Loot and White People Find Groceries!

    "Flickr user dustin3000 uploads two similar news photos that show flood victims in New Orleans wading in chest-deep water. In each, a person appears to be dragging a bag or box or two of food or beverages.

    The images were shot by different photographers, and captioned by different photo wire services. The Associated Press caption accompanying the image with a black person says he's just finished "looting" a grocery store. The AFP/Getty Images caption describes lighter skinned people "finding" bread and soda from a grocery store. No stores are open to sell these goods" (Flckr user Dustin300, BoingBoing)


    Where's the love?

    Show it by bying grocery for your new neighbors. Surprise them and show your love. You are living among people who don't have anything. Yet, they have children to feed. Buy a bottle of milk and some juice for them. Feed them and reach out to them. We are all human beings who can get hungry and thirsty.

    In harsh conditions, Blacks, Caucasians, Asians or any ethnic groups can resort to uncivilized acts. Survival acts.

    This past week gives us some proof of the great length that people can to go to survive. It's worth mentioning the controversy that pushed Yahoo News photo to remove a picture of a white couple carrying groceries from a looted store and that of an African American also carrying groceries from the same store. The Black American was portrayed as a looter while the caucasion cauple, as grocery finders. The worst thing is that AFP forced its clients, including Yahoo to remove only the white couple's picture. The black guy's pic is still there. Is it done in a way to show that the Black guy was truly looting. Yes, there was looting in most places in New Orleans. It's even reported that some police were distributing things, items to hungry and thirsty people. The police needed clothes and socks to keep dry. They had lost everything too.

    What should the international community think about something like this?

    Hatred, racism and discrimination limit our actions and acts of kindness. When we have them, we become blind. We don't seem to be able to function well. We regard those who are different from us as strangers or enemies. We are not quick to respond and help them out. These biases prevent us from seeing people as people. Why do we have to label first?


    What if these three people had a totally different story? What if they came out or survived to tell us about their nightmarish crossings? They could tell us they were not into looting. They were just crossing. Would all the networks change the story.

    It seems that one way or the other, race always puts out its ugly head everywhere in America.

    Source:http://www.boingboing.net/2005/08/30/black_people_loot_wh.html

    What Others Are Saying, Writing, Reading, and Doing: Actions, Reactions to Katrina

    "The photos were by two different photographers working for two different news agencies, The Associated Press and AFP/Getty Images. But they appeared together on Yahoo News, and they sparked a flurry of blog entries, emails and calls contending the captions were unfair to blacks.

    "The pictures appear to be identical but one individual is "looting" and the other is "finding" needed items!" one person wrote the AP. "This is irresponsible journalism and fuels the attitude that 'all' African-Americans are looters."

    On Thursday, Yahoo withdrew the photo of the light-skinned pair at the request of Agence France Presse, which distributes Getty's U.S-produced photos internationally. In a note, Yahoo wrote it "regrets that these photos and captions, viewed together, may have suggested a racial bias on our part.

    AFP said it withdrew the photo because it had been flooded with time-consuming phone calls and emails, while already stretched covering the enormous tragedy.

    "It's safe to say that it was just causing us a lot of problems," said Bob Pearson, AFP's director of photography in the United States.

    The Associated Press said its policy was clear.

    "When we see people go into businesses and come out with goods, we call it looting," said Santiago Lyon, AP's director of photography. "When we just see them carrying things down the road, we call it carrying items" (dailyadvance.com)

    =======================
    John Nichols posted this, "Commenting on the facilities that have been set up for the evacuees -- cots crammed side-by-side in a huge stadium where the lights never go out and the sound of sobbing children never completely ceases -- former First Lady Barbara Bush concluded that the poor people of New Orleans had lucked out.

    "Everyone is so overwhelmed by the hospitality. And so many of the people in the arena here, you know, were underprivileged anyway, so this, this is working very well for them," Mrs. Bush told American Public Media's "Marketplace" program, before returning to her multi-million dollar Houston home.

    On the tape of the interview, Mrs. Bush chuckles audibly as she observes just how great things are going for families that are separated from loved ones, people who have been forced to abandon their homes and the only community where they have ever lived, and parents who are explaining to children that their pets, their toys and in some cases their friends may be lost forever. Perhaps the former first lady was amusing herself with the notion that evacuees without bread could eat cake" (John Nichols, thenation.com on Yahoo News)


    Barbara: 'Victims poor anyway'

    "Barbara Bush, the former first lady, courted controversy by pointing out that many of the people forced out of their homes by Hurricane Katrina "were underprivileged anyway". Mrs Bush, who joined her husband, George, on a tour of the Houston Astrodome, said: "And so many of the people in the arena here were underprivileged anyway, so this is working very well for them. What I'm hearing, which is sort of scary, is they all want to stay in Texas. Everyone is so overwhelmed by the hospitality." (http://news.independent.co.uk/world/americas/article310798.ece)

    ====================




    US Secretary of State, Condoleeza Rice, about the President's heart aching about people in need
    I'm a Southerner. I was born in Alabama. My father was born and raised in Louisiana. I thought that it would be helpful to have a member of the Administration go to Alabama to have some of the people there get a sense of how much it's on all of our minds and all of our prayers, how much we care about what's happening there. The President's heart aches when he sees Americans in need, and that's a message that I can carry. It's not my normal responsibility as Secretary of State, but I am a member of the Adminis tration and I want to try and be helpful.

    Americans don't want to see Americans suffer. And I just don't believe that people are saying, oh, well, those are African-Americans so we won't help - this was a disaster of enormous proportion and it overwhelmed the systems initially that were set up to deal with it.

    Clearly, one of the questions that people will have to deal with is when you have a large-scale evacuation, the poor and the sick - of any colour - but particularly sick people and older people, are the ones who have difficulty getting out. And so I'm sure that everybody is going to take a hard look at how to do that better.

    Nobody, most especially the President, would have left people unattended because of their race. It just isn't in his make-up or the makeup of the people at Fema [Federal Emergency Management Agency]. I just don't believe it. I think when people step back and look, there will be lots to understand about why people couldn't get out, but I don't think it had anything to do with race.

    The lesson that I take from this is that all the years that America was the largest food aid donor and the largest donor of regional development, and people know that. They have said that America has been so generous in times like this in other places, and now it is time to be generous to America. We've received offers of assistance from some 70 countries, countries as powerful and big as France or China, and as small as the Bahamas, or one of the most touching ones for me was Sri Lanka, which is still recovering from its own natural disaster. They've offered a cash donation of $25,000.

    I'm a Southerner. I was born in Alabama. My father was born and raised in Louisiana. I thought that it would be helpful to have a member of the Administration go to Alabama to have some of the people there get a sense of how much it's on all of our minds and all of our prayers, how much we care about what's happening there. The President's heart aches when he sees Americans in need, and that's a message that I can carry. It's not my normal responsibility as Secretary of State, but I am a member of the Adminis tration and I want to try and be helpful.

    Americans don't want to see Americans suffer. And I just don't believe that people are saying, oh, well, those are African-Americans so we won't help - this was a disaster of enormous proportion and it overwhelmed the systems initially that were set up to deal with it.

    Clearly, one of the questions that people will have to deal with is when you have a large-scale evacuation, the poor and the sick - of any colour - but particularly sick people and older people, are the ones who have difficulty getting out. And so I'm sure that everybody is going to take a hard look at how to do that better.

    Nobody, most especially the President, would have left people unattended because of their race. It just isn't in his make-up or the makeup of the people at Fema [Federal Emergency Management Agency]. I just don't believe it. I think when people step back and look, there will be lots to understand about why people couldn't get out, but I don't think it had anything to do with race.

    The lesson that I take from this is that all the years that America was the largest food aid donor and the largest donor of regional development, and people know that. They have said that America has been so generous in times like this in other places, and now it is time to be generous to America. We've received offers of assistance from some 70 countries, countries as powerful and big as France or China, and as small as the Bahamas, or one of the most touching ones for me was Sri Lanka, which is still recovering from its own natural disaster. They've offered a cash donation of $25,000.

    =======================

    Explaining the two pictures, one by AP and the other by AFP

    "The other photo was from AFP/Getty Images. It showed two white people. The caption was - oh, how shall I put this? - just a tad different:

    "Two residents wade through chest-deep water after finding bread and soda from a local grocery store after Hurricane Katrina came through the area in New Orleans, Louisiana."

    So the black kid "looted" a grocery store. The white couple "found" their goods.

    Quite a few black folks - not all of them prone to a knee-jerk charge of white racism -noticed the difference. Internet chat rooms were soon abuzz with debate about whether race was a factor in the way the two captions were phrased.

    To determine that, we have to look closely at the circumstances under which the photos were taken and discern the differences. And the first difference in the captions is that, whatever sins AFP/Getty committed, its writers at least correctly hyphenated the compound modifier "chest-deep." (We journalists can be a nit-picking lot.)

    The second difference was noted by AFP/Getty photographer Chris Graythen - who took the photo of the white couple - in Jim Romenesko's online column at the Poynter Institute Web site.

    "I believed in my opinion that they did simply find them," said Graythen. "The people were swimming in chest-deep water, and there were other people in the water, both white and black. I looked for the best picture. There were a million items floating in the water. We were near a grocery store that had five-plus feet of water in it. It had no doors. The water was moving and the stuff was floating away. These people were not ducking into a store and busting down windows to get electronics. They picked up bread and Cokes that were floating in the water. They would have floated away anyhow."

    That sounds like a reasonable and cogent defense of why AFP/Getty editors went with the caption they chose. But then the muckety-mucks at AFP/Getty shot themselves in the foot: they asked Yahoo and other news services to yank the offending picture from their databases. Yahoo complied. But that prompts the question: If there was nothing wrong with the photo or the caption, why pull them?

    One clue: AFP stands for Agence France-Presse. You figure an operation run by the French - the same folks who have made cop-killer Mumia Abu Jamal an international cause celebre - would wimp out to political correctness" (Christopher Kane, Baltimore Sun)

    ==============



    "You want to know why all those black people are stuck down there dying?" asked Yvette Brown, an African-American evacuee from New Orleans. "If they were white, they'd be gone. They'd be sending in an army of helicopters, jets and boats."

    Brown saw potential racial bias in the fact that thousands of people were trapped at the convention center for days, crying out for help. Some were elderly and sick, some were children in need of baby formula.

    In New Orleans, the city's mostly black, mostly poor 7th Ward was mired in hip-deep water and its residents tired, thirsty, hungry and angry. Race played a role, some said, and so did economics. "Every time there's a flood here, it always goes through the poor people," said Richard Boissiere, 60.

    But not all held the view that racism was involved. "I don't think it was racist," said Edith Thibodeaux, 40, of New Orleans' east side. "They were just trying to save the area for the tourists. It's about how much money they can make in this city. They don't care about us." Both Boissiere and Thibodeaux are black" (Chicago Tribune).



    ====================

    What Happens to Men's Best Friends: New Orleans Pets Are Left To Fend for Themselves



    Dog foods are also necessary. When and who is going to initiate the rescue of these beautiful animals? If they are nice enough to cooperate, they should have a chance to life.

    New Orleans pets are alone. They need help. Their guardians are not there to care for them any longer. We need to do something.

    Sunday, September 04, 2005

    Bayou Farewell by Mike Tidwell: The Rich Life and Tragic Death of Louisiana's Cajun Coast: A Book To Read



    This is a great book that everybody should have read. The authorities should have also read it and acted upon it. It shows the monumental challenge that would result from the breaking of the levees. People of New Orleans always knew they were dealing with danger, but nobdoy knew this type of flooding would probably cost the life of so many and desert the city.

    Appearing on "Meet with The Press" with Tim Russert, Mike said, "Nobody should touch any boards unless they correct the environmental damages that have been around for so long." In other words, There's a chance that these floodings may happen again if New Orleans is rebuilt in the same spot under sea level without doing extensive work to repair the ecology.

    This excerpt is provided only to show how timely this book is. A review would not make enough justice to it. So here's part of the first chapter.

    It's written by Mike Tidwell in a journalistic manner. It's very easy to read and understand.


    "You ever been down de baya before?" Papoose asks in his heavy Cajun accent. Down here the word "bayou" comes out "baya" and "down de baya" means, in effect, "our home," chez nous, that watery rural Louisiana place located at the very end of the world just the way locals like it. Not too many outsiders, lost or otherwise, wander this deep into the region. And certainly none walk up asking for rides aboard working shrimp boats.

    "No," I tell Papoose, lowering my backpack to the wharf. "This is my first trip down here."

    "What about shrimpin'?" he asks. "You know anyt'ing about shrimpin'?"

    "No," I say again, confessing my knowledge of Cajun fishing customs is nil. "Mais, je parle un peu de français," I say, hoping to establish a connection. "And I have a great love of boats and I'm happy to work as an unpaid deckhand."

    Papoose's facial expression still doesn't budge.

    "I just want to float down the bayou with you," I say. "That's all. It doesn't matter how far you're going. I'm just traveling. I just want to get downstream."

    Suddenly he looks a bit less confused. He doesn't exactly smile, but the idea starts to sink in.

    "Just travelin', huh? Like a tourist?"

    I nod.

    "Well, okay den. Why didn't you say so? Put your pack in de cabin."

    I see his hand, still stained with engine grease, suddenly outstretched toward mine. I cross the wharf and shake it.

    "I can take you as far as Leeville, an hour and a half downstream. I'm going shrimpin' down dere right now."

    Papoose is the first fisherman I've met, after a brief search, who's heading my way-and just like that, in the melting swelter of the South Louisiana sun, I have my first ride. Papoose unties from the dock and we begin floating down the sleepy olive-green water of Bayou Lafourche. His quick invitation to board belies the myth of bad-tempered swamp people hostile to all outsiders. In reality, bayou Cajuns turn out to be some of the most hospitable people I've met anywhere.

    "Bayou" is a Choctaw Indian word meaning sluggish, slow-moving stream, and this one, Bayou Lafourche, is maybe two hundred feet wide and ten feet deep, situated about an hour and a half southwest of New Orleans. It follows a southeasterly course toward the Gulf, and as it passes through the tiny Cajun town of Golden Meadow, where I met Papoose, it's lined with all manner of fishing vessels tied to wooden docks cushioned with used-tire bumpers. These range from the vaguely tugboat look of shrimp trawlers to the longer bargelike proportions of oyster boats to the quicker, smaller crab boats, many barely bigger than rowboats with outboard motors. Papoose's fifty-year-old wooden trawler has a high, jaunty bow that flares back along softly sloping gunwales to a broad, square stern.

    The town buildings, meanwhile, hug the bayou banks like swimmers to a lifeline: a few modern houses, rusting trailer homes on pilings, a Piggly Wiggly grocery store, two gas stations, a tin-roofed oyster bar, some rope swings tied to overhanging willows. Passing the town's main commercial bank, Papoose gives a long, low blow of the boat horn, and his wife, Faye, a teller, comes out the front door to wave goodbye to her husband and sons. The shrimpers are sometimes gone three or four days, and all necessary provisions have been stowed on board. A five-pound bag of red onions hangs side by side with a life preserver from hooks on the wooden wheelhouse wall.

    Barely a few blocks back from the riverbank, on either side of the bayou, the town of Golden Meadow stops abruptly, giving way to an endless maze of marsh grass and open water and more marsh grass adorned with statuesque snowy egrets fishing stone-still in a pose straight out of an Audubon painting. The town actually rests atop natural earthen levees created by the Mississippi River when this bayou-Lafourche-was the Mississippi's course to the sea seven hundred years ago.

    The forward motion of Papoose's boat creates a cooling, hair-tussling breeze that deepens the exquisite sense of freedom I feel leaning against the port gunwale, my backpack stored away. I'm drifting through Louisiana on the boat of a Cajun I just met, going I know not exactly where. It is, admittedly, a unique feeling seeing my car grow smaller and smaller along the bayou road, not knowing how or when I'll see it again. But I try not to worry, focusing instead on rolling up my pant legs and taking off my shoes.

    Shoes seem forbidden here: Papoose and his three sons are barefoot and Papoose actually steers the boat wheel with his toes, sitting on a tall stool at the helm. All afternoon I never see his hands touch the wheel, just his toes, freeing him to operate the two-way radio mike and speak French with his best friend Goo Goo, another shrimper downstream. I have trouble following the conversation, not only because it's Cajun French but because there are actually variations of the language from region to region in Louisiana. "The word we use down here on Bayou Lafourche for turtle is de same word dey use up in Lafayette for a woman's private parts," laughs Papoose, who's forty-two years old and has a broad, toothy smile.

    Even Papoose's English can be hard to follow. Several Cajuns I meet later say that when they travel more than a few miles outside Louisiana, other Americans are often baffled by their accents. People ask if they're from the Caribbean, Quebec, South America. Not that your average bayou Cajun travels much, thanks to the region's history of poverty and isolated culture. An amazing number of people I meet over the next few days have never been in an airplane, never owned a credit card, never read a book, never seen a hill much taller than the thirty-foot Indian mounds scattered across the marshland, constructed from millions of discarded clam shells in a centuries-long process.

    I ask Papoose what he was talking about on the radio with Goo Goo.

    "De tide," he tells me. "Dere's gonna be a strong tide goin' out tonight and dat's good. It flushes de shrimp outta de marsh. But we got us a sout' wind kickin' up too, from de udder direction, and dat can hold de tide back some. So me and Goo Goo, we were tryin' to decide, wit' dese conditions, what's de best place to grab Mr. Shrimp. Maybe a bay. Maybe a bayou. Maybe a canal."

    It's a lot more complicated, in other words, than just dropping the nets and gunning the engine.

    An hour down the bayou, Papoose announces he's decided to head west along a canal and then push north up into uninhabited Bayou Blue to do some shrimping toward Catfish Lake. This is certified backcountry, accessible only by boat. He'll have me in Leeville, he says, perhaps around 2 a.m. Then he asks if I like Cajun-style venison sausage with red beans and rice.

    I tell him I think I do just as pots begin to rattle atop the ship stove behind me.

    I'm starting to feel seriously trapped on this fifty-three-foot boat-and the sensation is worth its weight in gold, like the liberating feeling a successful stowaway must feel. There may be many ways to visit the lower third of Louisiana known as Cajun country, home to descendants of French immigrants savagely expelled from Nova Scotia during the French and Indian War in the mid-eighteenth century. But one thing is certain: with America's recent fascination for all things Cajun, considerable authenticity has been lost in the act of translation to mass culture. Overexposure has brought "nouvelle cuisine" gumbo to New Orleans restaurants and given rise across the state to unfortunate "swamp tours" whose often garish roadside signs promise rehearsed hospitality from good ol' boys with trained alligators that rush toward tour boats on command, chomping jumbo-size marshmallows tossed overboard. And with the popular rise of Cajun music, who knows if that washboard player you hear in Lafayette is a local or an enthusiast from the Chicago suburbs who's memorized all the French lyrics?

    This is not to say that genuine, down-home Cajun culture no longer exists. It does. In spades. You just have to sidestep the scattered imitators along the way. Which was my goal, precisely, in roaming this far down the bayou and simply hopping on a boat. Just now, as Papoose pulls out the venison sausage and I grab my map to see just where in the heck we're heading, I realize I've tumbled into the committed traveler's ultimate dream: complete cultural immersion. This boat is a floating universe of Cajun bayou life and the only way off is to swim to shore through alligator-infested waters. For the next several days, I'll serve under the command of several Cajun captains, eating from the same enamel galley skillets as my hosts, talking about what they talk about, going where they go, doing what they do. And from them, soon, I'll learn firsthand of the troubling forces, huge beyond comprehension, now bringing their world crashing down upon their heads.

    A few miles south of Golden Meadow, as all permanent structures gradually begin to disappear and the bayou steadily widens in its slow crawl toward the Gulf, I spy a strange sight. Off to the left, in the distant marsh, a cluster of about two dozen large oak trees stand leafless and dead in the water, their skeletal, gnarled branches attached to sun-bleached trunks that extend directly into the brackish waves. These oaks aren't swamp trees. They grow on land. Yet there's no solid land within five hundred feet of them. Farther downstream, there's another odd sight: a long stretch of telephone poles is submerged in water along the two-lane road paralleling the bayou. Why sink the poles in water, I wonder. Isn't there something inherently foolish, even dangerous, about stringing power lines over open water when solid land is just ten feet away?

    But too many other sights intervene before I can put these questions to Papoose. Soon an imposing sunset finds us motoring up serpentine Bayou Blue, shrimp nets in the water. We're surrounded by a magical, wide-open landscape of golden-green marsh grass stretching as far as the eye can see, dotted only occasionally with the distant outline of other shrimp boats. A summer thunderstorm has come and gone, interrupting a sumptuous dinner with raindrops that seep through the old boat's leaky roof. Porpoises rise and fall in the bayou water around us, chasing speckled trout just as a rainbow plunges toward the eastern horizon and the sun sinks toward violently bruised clouds, billowy in hues of dark purple, indigo, and pink.

    In the wheelhouse, Papoose scans the two-way radio and we overhear fishermen speaking Cajun English and French. We hear the twang of Texas oil workers heading out to offshore platforms and the exotic language of exiled Vietnamese shrimpers who've fished these waters since the 1975 fall of Saigon, drawn to America's own elaborate version of the Mekong Delta. Completing the ethnic gumbo are French-speaking Houma Indians, driven by European settlers over the centuries to the farthest ends of the bayou country where they now survive as expert fishermen.

    Bayou people have a flare for colorful nicknames, and over the radio they go flying. I overhear a fisherman named "Gator" asking another named "Dirt" to come help repair a broken boom. Then "Rooster" wants to know if anyone wants to buy a sack of crawfish from his brother's pond. And "Tattoo" goes on and on, in self-righteous monologue, about how the politicians up in Baton Rouge are once again trying to screw the state's Cajun people out of their fair share of government services.

    As darkness descends over our slow crawl up Bayou Blue, Papoose tells me he got his own nickname after being born extremely premature. His mother has a photo of him sleeping inside a shoe box, he says. So common are nicknames along Bayou Lafourche, he says, that phone books are useless to many people, since a man's real name may be completely unknown to his friends.

    Papoose tells me all this with a chuckle, but he soon stops laughing as the first catch of the evening comes in. The jumble of armored tails and stalked eyes covering the back deck are Louisiana's famous "brown shrimp," Farfante penaeus aztecus, a staple crop for Cajun shrimpers from mid-May to late June. But tonight's first haul is extremely slim, signaling an unproductive evening ahead. Papoose's son Cody ices down the shrimp, then washes off the deck with a bucket tied to a rope and lowered into the bathwater-warm bayou, dark as tar just five feet below us.

    Papoose leaves the wheelhouse and heads around back to inspect the catch. Doubling his disappointment, the shrimp are exceedingly small, eighty or ninety to a pound. "I can't even pay for my fuel wit' a catch like dis," he says.

    I nod in sympathy, having heard this sort of talk many times before. I've worked on farms in the past and spent time with commercial crabbers. But Cajun trawlers, with their Latin disposition toward fiery emotions, seem particularly given to grousing. And no wonder. Given the vast array of factors large and small completely beyond their control, from cantankerous weather to calamitous markets to craven creditors to a history as an oppressed minority within the state of Louisiana, it's little surprise that the bellies of these men regularly ache with frustration and the fear of bankruptcy.

    Yet Papoose's words that night ring with more than just the reflexive grumbling of a man having a bad night in an otherwise routine shrimp season. "We had a great May," he says, "but dis whole mont' of June has been rotten. Every year it just gets harder and harder to make a living at dis."



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Excerpted from Bayou Farewell by Mike Tidwell Copyright © 2003 by Mike Tidwell
    Publisher: Random House

    New Orleans, La Nouvelle Orleans: What Do People Know

    Let's let Anne Rice tell us.

    "Do they take away with them an awareness that it has always been not only a great white metropolis but also a great black city, a city where African-Americans have come together again and again to form the strongest African-American culture in the land?
    The first literary magazine ever published in Louisiana was the work of black men, French-speaking poets and writers who brought together their work in three issues of a little book called L'Album Littéraire. That was in the 1840's, and by that time the city had a prosperous class of free black artisans, sculptors, businessmen, property owners, skilled laborers in all fields. Thousands of slaves lived on their own in the city, too, making a living at various jobs, and sending home a few dollars to their owners in the country at the end of the month.
    This is not to diminish the horror of the slave market in the middle of the famous St. Louis Hotel, or the injustice of the slave labor on plantations from one end of the state to the other. It is merely to say that it was never all "have or have not" in this strange and beautiful city.
    Later in the 19th century, as the Irish immigrants poured in by the thousands, filling the holds of ships that had emptied their cargoes of cotton in Liverpool, and as the German and Italian immigrants soon followed, a vital and complex culture emerged. Huge churches went up to serve the great faith of the city's European-born Catholics; convents and schools and orphanages were built for the newly arrived and the struggling; the city expanded in all directions with new neighborhoods of large, graceful houses, or areas of more humble cottages, even the smallest of which, with their floor-length shutters and deep-pitched roofs, possessed an undeniable Caribbean charm...." (Anne Rice, New York Times)

    Read the rest of the article at New York Times, online version.

    Eyewitnesses of the Forces of Nature

    According to an AP report, a dead body is pictured lying wrapped in a sheet on a piece of plywood on Rampart Street just outside the French Quarter in New Orleans, La., Sunday, Sept. 4, 2005. The city is littered with bodies, some of them victims of Hurricane Katrina and some of them victims of the post hurricane violence that gripped the city for several days before troops arrived.

    Various cable TV reports from Foxnews.com, CNN and CNBC show dead people lying around. Some bodies have been spotted going down.

    Many police officers just walked off the force. Some of them committed suicide.

    What ever happens to these important landmarks?

    "The French Quarter: This historic district is full of wrought-iron balconies and ornate colonial architecture, but was also a playground for adults who could roam the streets with cocktails in tow and listen to jazz and, during Mardi Gras, grab for beads and go wild. The area escaped much of the flooding.

    Bourbon Street: A hedonistic strip in the Quarter bursting with bars like Pat O'Brien's, Molly's on the Market, and Jean Laffite's Blacksmith Shop. The latter, a piano bar, was supposedly the in-town headquarters of pirate Jean Laffite, who owned more than 10 vessels and raided American, British and Spanish ships in the early 1800s. Located in the French Quarter, the area escaped flooding but remains closed.

    Cafe du Monde: Established in 1862, this coffee shop on Decatur Street in the French Quarter was best known for its cafe au lait, made with hearty New Orleans-style coffee, blended with chicory, and beignets — crispy, square doughnuts. Still standing.

    Galatoire's: Nearly a century old, the tiled and mirrored restaurant was famous for not taking reservations. The tuxedo-clad wait staff served Creole classics like shrimp remoulade and crab meat maison. Also located in the French Quarter. Still standing.

    Acme Oyster House: Built more than 90 years ago at the gateway to the French Quarter, the menu included raw oysters (pronounced "ersters") and traditional po' boys, or fried oyster sandwiches.

    Anne Rice's home: Tourists and fans of the "Vampire Chronicles" books would visit the Garden District home of author Anne Rice. She has also helped create several "haunted tours" of the city. The area was battered by high winds which knocked down trees. Rice no longer lives there, though that hasn't stopped the tourists from stopping by." (AP, 2005)


    Anything to help our fellow citizens: Wynton Marsalis and a New Orleans native on piano
    PromQuincenera

    Foreign Nations are Donating to the US

    So far, Kuwait which the US rescued from the hands of Saddam Hussein, plans to give the US half a billion dollars for the reconstruction of the Katrina ravaged region. Both the friends and enemies of the US plan to help out.

    Survivors Need Everything To Rebuild Their Lives: Examples of What They Need





    Welcome to Katrina Shopping: From Electronics to Furniture, Computers and more

    We are about helping the victims and survivors of Hurricane Katrina shop to rebuild their lives. They'll shop for everything.

    From housing to school supplies, from homes to appartments, they'll have to start anew. They need digital cameras so they can document their lives. They need pens, paper and batteries. They need everything. Shop for yourself and shop for them!

    All Disaster Relief

    Katrina Survivors Need Help!

    Other Resources:

    www.shareyourhomes.com

    www.welcomewagon.com

    www.openyourhome.com

    www.katrinahousing.org

    www.nola.com



    KatrinaHousing: Help Katrina Survivors Find Housing in your State and Community

    Do you want to sell your home, property or any real Estate?:

    Agent Evaluator Seller

    Do you want to buy homes and properties? Start here:

    Agent Evaluator Buyer

    Home Evaluation: Do you know the value of your home and properties?

    Home Evaluation Tool: Find the value of your home

    Miami/Fort Lauderdale Area/North Miami Beach

    Miami/Fort Lauderdale ARea/North Beach Real Estate

    San Francisco Bay Area - East Bay/Fremont

    Fremont Real Estate: Immigrants Buy $Multimillion Homes

    San Francisco Bay Area - North Bay/Napa

    Welcome to Wine Country Real Estate: Napa Valley

    San Francisco Bay Area - Santa Clara/San Mateo/Mountain View

    Santa Clara Real Estate: Retire Around Here!

    Fresno-Clovis Area

    The Last Frontier Real Estate: Affordable Homes and Land, Orchards, Fruit Trees

    Fresno Area/Pinedale, Calif.

    Fresno Area, Pinedale: Riverpark Shopping Center and Lowes Stores

    Lake Tahoe Area

    Lake Tahoe Area's Real Estate

    Houston-Dallas Area

    Houston Area Real Estate: Homes For Sale

    Georgia, Savannah Area

    Georgia's Historic and Suburban Homes with Huge Yards For Sale

    Hawaii/Big Island

    Hawaii Homes for Sale

    Atlanta Area

    Atlanta Homes for sale

    West Palm Beach/Boca Raton Area

    Hot West Palm Beach Homes for sale

    Panama City Area: Spring Break Capital!

    Panama City Homes for Sale

    Tampa/St. Petersburg/Clearwater Area

    Get Your Dream Home in Tampa, Florida

    Daytona Beach Area: Car Racing Capital

    Daytona Beach Homes

    Miami/Fort Lauderdale Area

    Fort Lauderdale Homes for Sale

    Find Homes For Sale in Florida

    Find Homes for Sale in Pennsylvania

    Texas' MLS Homes For Sale!

    California's Hot Housing Market: Homes for Sale

    Last Frontier Real Estate: Find Affordable Homes

    San Diego's Hot Housing Market: Homes for Sale!

    Santa Barbara's Exclusive Homes For Sale

    Find Homes For Sale in Hot Miami Real Estate

    Hurry Up to Locate Your Business in Oakhurst, California

    Savannah, Georgia Real Estate: Rebirth of the New South

    Find Vacation Homes at Lake Tahoe Real Estate

    High-priced Homes at West Palm Beach, Florida

    Find your Vacation Home for Spring Break & Holidays

    Find Homes for Sale at Daytona Beach, Florida

    Huntington Beach Famous Real Estate

    Silicon Valley's Sleeping Community: Los Banos Homes For Sale

    Super Hot Pacific Palisades Real Estate Market

    Get Your Dream Home at Chico/Paradise Area

    Phoenix/Mesa Area Homes Are Hot: Want To Buy There?

    Bakersfield Offers Affordable Homes For Sale

    No Place Can Beat the Fresno-Clovis Real Estate in Affordability of Prices

    Do You Want to Purchase an Orange County, Imperial County Home?

    Monterrey/Salinas Residential Properties, Homes and Office Space Are As Hot as Apple Pies:
    Think about the water-front, beach-front properties!

    Are you ready to settle in Mendocino, California?

    Orange County Appeal: Beautiful Homes and Access to the center of Los Angeles, Hollywood Culture

    Merced Area Homes Are Going Fast Thanks to the New UC university: Great Investment!

    Riverside/San Bernardino County Homes for Sale!

    San Diego Area Real Estate Offers Great Advantages: Invest and buy homes!

    Find San Francisco Bay Area-Santa Clara/San Mateo Homes for sale!

    Santa Barbara and Wine Country Homes for sale

    Ventural County Homes, Properties for sale!

    Coastal Homes and Properties for sale in San Luis Obispo Area

    Find homes and properties in the Sacramento Areas

    Stockton/Lodi Area’s homes for sale

    Buy a First home, a Second Home or Vacation Home in Ski Country

    Denver/Boulder/Greeley Area Homes for sale

    Eau Claire Area’s homes and Properties:
    Get your dream home in the back country!

    Green Bay, Wisconsin has some of the best natural places to live
    Start searching for a home there

    Start looking for homes in Tacoma Area-Pierce/Thurston Counties

    Madison Area Homes for sale: Get a taste of this vibrant city life!

    Seattle Area: Bill Gates’s Country
    Buy a home in the Seattle Area!

    Provo/Orem Area Homes and Properties for sale

    Find Your Dream Home among Salt Lake City/Ogden Area Homes and Properties

    Do You Want to buy homes in Dallas/Fort Worth Area?

    You can’t resist the lure of San Antonio Real Estate Investments

    ---------------------------------------------------

    Visit AmerikakankareAboutPeople Network

    Santa Barbara's Exclusive Homes For Sale

    Find Homes For Sale in Hot Miami Real Estate

    Hurry Up to Locate Your Business in Pinedale, California

    Savannah, Georgia Real Estate: Rebirth of the South

    Find Vacation Homes at Lake Tahoe Real Estate

    High-priced Homes at West Palm Beach, Florida

    Find your Vacation Home for Spring Break & Holidays

    Find Homes for Sale at Daytona Beach, Florida

    Huntington Beach Famous Real Estate

    Silicon Valley's Sleeping Community: Los Banos Homes For Sale

    Super hot Pacific Palisades Real Estate Market

    Find Homes For Sale in Florida

    Find Homes for Sale in Pennsylvania

    Texas' MLS Homes For Sale!

    California's Hot Housing Market: Homes for Sale

    Last Frontier Real Estate: Find Affordable Homes

    San Diego's Hot Housing Market: Homes for Sale!

    Santa Barbara's Exclusive Homes For Sale

    Santa Barbara's Exclusive Homes For Sale

    Find Homes For Sale in Hot Miami Real Estate

    Hurry Up to Locate Your Business in Pinedale, California

    Savannah, Georgia Real Estate: Rebirth of the South

    Find Vacation Homes at Lake Tahoe Real Estate

    High-priced Homes at West Palm Beach, Florida

    Find your Vacation Home for Spring Break & Holidays

    Find Homes for Sale at Daytona Beach, Florida

    Huntington Beach Famous Real Estate

    Silicon Valley's Sleeping Community: Los Banos Homes For Sale

    Super hot Pacific Palisades Real Estate Market

    Shopnowshop Real Estate’s Featured Links

    Get Your Dream Home at Chico/Paradise Area

    Phoenix/Mesa Area Homes Are Hot: Want To Buy There?

    Bakersfield Offers Affordable Homes For Sale

    No Place Can Beat the Fresno-Clovis Real Estate in Affordability of Prices

    Do You Want to Purchase an Orange County, Imperial County Home?

    Monterrey/Salinas Residential Properties, Homes and Office Space Are As Hot as Apple Pies:
    Think about the water-front, beach-front properties!

    Are you ready to settle in Mendocino, California?

    Orange County Appeal: Beautiful Homes and Access to the center of Los Angeles, Hollywood Culture

    Merced Area Homes Are Going Fast Thanks to the New UC university: Great Investment!

    Riverside/San Bernardino County Homes for Sale!

    San Diego Area Real Estate Offers Great Advantages: Invest and buy homes!

    Find San Francisco Bay Area-Santa Clara/San Mateo Homes for sale!

    Santa Barbara and Wine Country Homes for sale

    Ventural County Homes, Properties for sale!

    Coastal Homes and Properties for sale in San Luis Obispo Area

    Find homes and properties in the Sacramento Areas

    Stockton/Lodi Area’s homes for sale

    Buy a First home, a Second Home or Vacation Home in Ski Country

    Denver/Boulder/Greeley Area Homes for sale

    Eau Claire Area’s homes and Properties:
    Get your dream home in the back country!

    Green Bay, Wisconsin has some of the best natural places to live
    Start searching for a home there

    Start looking for homes in Tacoma Area-Pierce/Thurston Counties

    Madison Area Homes for sale: Get a taste of this vibrant city life!

    Seattle Area: Bill Gates’s Country
    Buy a home in the Seattle Area!

    Provo/Orem Area Homes and Properties for sale

    Find Your Dream Home among Salt Lake City/Ogden Area Homes and Properties

    Do You Want to buy homes in Dallas/Fort Worth Area?

    You can’t resist the lure of San Antonio Real Estate Investments

    Santa Barbara's Exclusive Homes For Sale

    Find Homes For Sale in Hot Miami Real Estate

    Hurry Up to Locate Your Business in Pinedale, California

    Savannah, Georgia Real Estate: Rebirth of the South

    Find Vacation Homes at Lake Tahoe Real Estate

    High-priced Homes at West Palm Beach, Florida

    Find your Vacation Home for Spring Break & Holidays

    Find Homes for Sale at Daytona Beach, Florida

    Huntington Beach Famous Real Estate

    Silicon Valley's Sleeping Community: Los Banos Homes For Sale

    Super hot Pacific Palisades Real Estate Market

    Find Homes For Sale in Florida

    Find Homes for Sale in Pennsylvania

    Texas' MLS Homes For Sale!

    California's Hot Housing Market: Homes for Sale

    Last Frontier Real Estate: Find Affordable Homes

    San Diego's Hot Housing Market: Homes for Sale!

    Santa Barbara's Exclusive Homes For Sale

    Santa Barbara's Exclusive Homes For Sale

    Find Homes For Sale in Hot Miami Real Estate

    Hurry Up to Locate Your Business in Pinedale, California

    Savannah, Georgia Real Estate: Rebirth of the South

    Find Vacation Homes at Lake Tahoe Real Estate

    High-priced Homes at West Palm Beach, Florida

    Find your Vacation Home for Spring Break & Holidays

    Find Homes for Sale at Daytona Beach, Florida

    Huntington Beach Famous Real Estate

    Silicon Valley's Sleeping Community: Los Banos Homes For Sale

    Super hot Pacific Palisades Real Estate Market

    Shopnowshop Real Estate’s Featured Links

    Get Your Dream Home at Chico/Paradise Area

    Phoenix/Mesa Area Homes Are Hot: Want To Buy There?

    Bakersfield Offers Affordable Homes For Sale

    No Place Can Beat the Fresno-Clovis Real Estate in Affordability of Prices

    Do You Want to Purchase an Orange County, Imperial County Home?

    Monterrey/Salinas Residential Properties, Homes and Office Space Are As Hot as Apple Pies:
    Think about the water-front, beach-front properties!

    Are you ready to settle in Mendocino, California?

    Orange County Appeal: Beautiful Homes and Access to the center of Los Angeles, Hollywood Culture

    Merced Area Homes Are Going Fast Thanks to the New UC university: Great Investment!

    Riverside/San Bernardino County Homes for Sale!

    San Diego Area Real Estate Offers Great Advantages: Invest and buy homes!

    Find San Francisco Bay Area-Santa Clara/San Mateo Homes for sale!

    Santa Barbara and Wine Country Homes for sale

    Ventural County Homes, Properties for sale!

    Coastal Homes and Properties for sale in San Luis Obispo Area

    Find homes and properties in the Sacramento Areas

    Stockton/Lodi Area’s homes for sale

    Buy a First home, a Second Home or Vacation Home in Ski Country

    Denver/Boulder/Greeley Area Homes for sale

    Eau Claire Area’s homes and Properties:
    Get your dream home in the back country!

    Green Bay, Wisconsin has some of the best natural places to live
    Start searching for a home there

    Start looking for homes in Tacoma Area-Pierce/Thurston Counties

    Madison Area Homes for sale: Get a taste of this vibrant city life!

    Seattle Area: Bill Gates’s Country
    Buy a home in the Seattle Area!

    Provo/Orem Area Homes and Properties for sale

    Find Your Dream Home among Salt Lake City/Ogden Area Homes and Properties

    Do You Want to buy homes in Dallas/Fort Worth Area?

    You can’t resist the lure of San Antonio Real Estate Investments

    Are You Ready to Buy Your First Home? Your Vacation Home or a Cabin?

    Selling Your Home Made Easy with This 1 2 3 Step

    How Much Is Your Home, Apartment or Condo Worth? Find Out Now

    Santa Barbara Homes, Wine and Sideways

    Find Homes For Sale in Florida

    Find Homes for Sale in Pennsylvania

    Texas' MLS Homes For Sale!

    California's Hot Housing Market: Homes for Sale

    Last Frontier Real Estate: Find Affordable Homes

    San Diego's Hot Housing Market: Homes for Sale!

    Santa Barbara's Exclusive Homes For Sale

    Santa Barbara's Exclusive Homes For Sale

    Find Homes For Sale in Hot Miami Real Estate

    Hurry Up to Locate Your Business in Pinedale, California

    Savannah, Georgia Real Estate: Rebirth of the South

    Find Vacation Homes at Lake Tahoe Real Estate

    High-priced Homes at West Palm Beach, Florida

    Find your Vacation Home for Spring Break & Holidays

    Find Homes for Sale at Daytona Beach, Florida

    Huntington Beach Famous Real Estate

    Silicon Valley's Sleeping Community: Los Banos Homes For Sale

    Super hot Pacific Palisades Real Estate Market

    Shopnowshop Real Estate’s Featured Links

    Get Your Dream Home at Chico/Paradise Area

    Phoenix/Mesa Area Homes Are Hot: Want To Buy There?

    Bakersfield Offers Affordable Homes For Sale

    No Place Can Beat the Fresno-Clovis Real Estate in Affordability of Prices

    Do You Want to Purchase an Orange County, Imperial County Home?

    Monterrey/Salinas Residential Properties, Homes and Office Space Are As Hot as Apple Pies:
    Think about the water-front, beach-front properties!

    Are you ready to settle in Mendocino, California?

    Orange County Appeal: Beautiful Homes and Access to the center of Los Angeles, Hollywood Culture

    Merced Area Homes Are Going Fast Thanks to the New UC university: Great Investment!

    Riverside/San Bernardino County Homes for Sale!

    San Diego Area Real Estate Offers Great Advantages: Invest and buy homes!

    Find San Francisco Bay Area-Santa Clara/San Mateo Homes for sale!

    Santa Barbara and Wine Country Homes for sale

    Ventural County Homes, Properties for sale!

    Coastal Homes and Properties for sale in San Luis Obispo Area

    Find homes and properties in the Sacramento Areas

    Stockton/Lodi Area’s homes for sale

    Buy a First home, a Second Home or Vacation Home in Ski Country

    Denver/Boulder/Greeley Area Homes for sale

    Eau Claire Area’s homes and Properties:
    Get your dream home in the back country!

    Green Bay, Wisconsin has some of the best natural places to live
    Start searching for a home there

    Start looking for homes in Tacoma Area-Pierce/Thurston Counties

    Madison Area Homes for sale: Get a taste of this vibrant city life!

    Seattle Area: Bill Gates’s Country
    Buy a home in the Seattle Area!

    Provo/Orem Area Homes and Properties for sale

    Find Your Dream Home among Salt Lake City/Ogden Area Homes and Properties

    Do You Want to buy homes in Dallas/Fort Worth Area?

    You can’t resist the lure of San Antonio Real Estate Investments


    Original content is copyright ©
    2004–2005 AllpromDresses, KatrinaKarnival,
    Shopallpromdresses, MiamiBeachProm etc.
    KatrinaShopping, New York Prom Dresses,
    WishList Shop, AllBikini.
    All other content, including photos, comments and quoted passages,
    is owned by the original author.
    The use of any such materials is only for the shopper’s wishlist
    and/or user's private, personal,
    non-commercial, and informational purpose.

    Video code provided by Music Video Codes